The APEGA 22 Key Competency & Indicators for CBA Applications - Part 3

The APEGA 22 Key Competency & Indicators for CBA Applications - Part 3

This is the third of several in a series of writing which includes examples on how to complete your experience requirements when applying for your APEGA licensure requirement. The examples presented here are based on my personal experience and will not necessarily be the same as yours. This serves only as guide and not a “copy and paste” approach.
For those who will write their Experience Records, I suggest starting by following the examples below. This will complete the 22 Key Competencies in the succeeding issues of the Alberta Filipino Journal. The complete competency category can be found on the APEGA website.

Competency Category 1 – Technical Competence
1.8 Project and Life Cycle
Exposure to all stages of the process/project life cycle from concept and feasibility analysis through implementation
Demonstrate awareness of project concerns and roles of other stakeholders in the project stages:
• Identification: generation of the initial project idea and preliminary design
• Preparation: detailed design of the project addressing technical and operational aspects
• Appraisal: analysis of the project from technical, financial, economic, social, institutional, and environmental perspectives
• Preparation of specifications and tender documents: preparation of tender document, inviting and opening of tenders, pre-qualification, evaluation of bids, and award of work
• Implementation and monitoring: implementation of project activities, with on-going checks on progress and feedback
• Evaluation: periodic review of project with feedback for the next project cycle

Example: Most of my involvement in the project starts with a meeting with the client and architects. Basic concept and drawings of the architect with the corresponding plan layout are presented. The location of columns as per the architect’s basic requirement was incorporated to initial structural plans. Required dimension of columns base from preliminary design were noted if it will not significantly affect the wall thickness and the architect’s intention of the design. Depth of beams, joist and slab were initially taken from my initial design and counterchecks to the architect’s elevation drawings if this will not affect their design. After all the basic requirements are coordinated to different discipline, detailed calculations will be done and coordinated to the structural designer for detail drawings. Once the final drawings are issued for bid, contractors issue a request for information (RFI) or request for clarification on the design wherein they can save more on the project cost. This might be a material substitution or possible design revision. My role in most of the projects I was involved with continues during the construction phase were site implementation of the site drawings are periodically monitored as part of Issued for Construction (IFC) drawings compliance.

1.9 Quality Control
Understand the concept of quality control during design and construction, including independent design check and independent reviews of design, field checks, and reviews
• Conduct checks, including field checks, to verify the validity of the design
• Complete quality management plan checklist, and follow the quality management plan
• Prepare quality control plans, including frequency and test parameters, for specific processes or products
• Evaluate test results, determine adequacy, and develop recommended action
• Demonstrate peer review
• Demonstrate completed project, systems, or subsystems meet project objectives in terms of functionality and operational performance
1.10 Engineering Documentation
Transfer design intentions to drawings and sketches; understand transmittal of design
• Ability to review designs of others and communicate findings and issues, including suggested alternatives
• Demonstrate the communication of ideas and concepts to project team members
• Demonstrate the understanding of the value of project completion reports and lessons learned. Reports to application in future projects by self or others.
• Produce sketches, notes, documentation, and design documents to prepare proposals, preliminary and final design drawings for acceptance by the client and approval by regulatory authorities

Example: My structural designs are always checked by a senior engineer or the Engineer on Record for each specific project before issue to the client. For coordination, designs were verbally communicated and discussed among my peers to have a good output free from error. Due diligence was implemented on my part before any submittals were issued. I value lessons learned during the implementation of the project. I keep record of lessons learned and make a continuous review so as not to repeat the same error that might affect the outcome of other projects.

1.10 Engineering Documentation
Transfer design intentions to drawings and sketches; understand transmittal of design
• Ability to review designs of others and communicate findings and issues, including suggested alternatives
• Demonstrate communication of ideas and concepts to project team members
• Demonstrate understanding of the value of project completion reports and lessons learned. Reports to application in future projects by self or others.
• Produce sketches, notes, documentation, and design documents to prepare proposals, preliminary and final design drawings for acceptance by the client and approval by regulatory authorities

Example: All my structural designs from concept, load assumption and detailed calculations are documented both electronically and in hard copy. I keep a document checklist on the different part of my design for easy review. Electronic copies are provided in the share folder of our department to ensure easy access among my peers for any eventual checking and comments. All lessons learned from past projects are recorded and I make sure that these were checked on the on-going project design process. Sketches, notes, comments and checklists were kept in a separate folder for future reference. These checklists were dated for easy trace for future reference.

Competency Category 2 – Communication
2.1 Oral Communication
• Communicate in a simple and concise manner
• Communicate official project data with team members, clients, and contractors
• Ability to express both technical and non-technical issues and ideas clearly to both technical and non-technical personnel
• Presentations to technical and non-technical groups; presentations to superiors and subordinates; internal (colleagues) and external (clients) presentations
• Presentation of project parameters to the public
• Demonstrate active participation in and contribution to meetings

Example: Coordination through emails and meetings are part of my daily activities. I always attend regular technical meetings between different disciplines and the client for coordination during and after the design process. Verbal coordination during site visits and site walk-through between me and the contractors are my usual site scenario which form part of my job.

2.2 Written Communication
• Tailor communications to the intended audience
• Ability to write and review technical documents
• Ability to write clear memos and reports to both technical and non-technical personnel
• Use drawings and sketches to demonstrate key points and concepts
• Demonstrate a written report on a technical subject
• Demonstrate a written report on field observations
• Take training in technical report writing
• Work with common office software programs and browsers

Example: Writing emails for coordination, replying to RFIs and writing site instructions are part of my job. Preparing design calculation reports and Site Inspection reports for each project occupies eighty percent (80%) of my job. Sketches by hand or by AutoCad are part of my daily activities for a better understanding between the technologist and my peers.

2.3 Reading and Comprehension
• Ability to review technical documents, to understand the implications, and to summarize key points

Example: Interpretation of different codes before any attempt to start the design process is very important. Interpreting code provisions need a lot of understanding of the English Language. I interpreted survey reports and geotechnical reports before I start the design process. The accurate interpretation of these reports will result in a precise design output.

To Be Continued

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